Hobo Hamburgers

hobo_hamburgersHobo Hamburgers

Level: Easy
Time: 55 Minutes, 10 Minutes Preparation, 45 Minutes Cook
Servings: 4

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 lbs ground beef
  • 1 cup cracker crumbs
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1/4 cup lemon juice
  • 1 cup cheese, grated
  • 1/2 cup green pepper, chopped
  • 2 teaspoons Paula Deen’s House Seasoning
  • 4 medium red potatoes, sliced thin
  • 1 large onion, sliced thin
  • 4 carrots, peeled and cut into strips
  • 4 slices bacon

Preparation

In a large bowl combine ground beef, cracker crumbs, egg, lemon juice, cheese, green pepper and House Seasoning. Mix well. Shape into 4 patties.

Place each patty onto 2 layers of heavy-duty aluminum foil (enough to cover and close). On each patty, place potato slices, onion slice, and carrots. Slice bacon in half and place both slices on top. Seal aluminum foil tightly and cook on campfire or in a 350°F oven for approximately 45 minutes


Caution and Respect

In days gone by, cooking over an open fire could be taken for granted. Today, with concerns about air quality, restricted areas for camping and dwindling firewood stocks in many campgrounds, the freedom to cook over an open fire is a privilege which requires the utmost in caution and respect. Here are a few important considerations:

Wood – Campfire cooking requires a clean-burning, hot fire. This is only achieved with dry, seasoned wood. Stripping trees of green wood is fruitless – your fire will be smoky, will burn poorly and create unnecessary pollution. If dry wood is not available, it will need to be packed in. Many public campgrounds supply firewood – call ahead to see what’s available.

Fire location – Pay close attention to the ground before preparing any fire. In circumstances where building your fire on a rock is not possible, one should ensure that the base of the fire is on bare mineral soil. A fire that is burning all evening has lots of time to burn through the organic layer of the soil and will not be put out with a simple bucket of water. Use previously established fire pits if available, to avoid scarring the area with more fire pits.

Wind – Any medium to strong wind is hazardous. The danger of sparks getting away can ignite a forest fire. Also, the coals will reduce more quickly and provide much less cooking time. If substantial wind shelter is unavailable, any outdoor fire is out of the question.

Posted in Recipes.

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